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How to Custom Design a Countertop

Although for years considered less than optimal for countertop use, laminates today have seen a surge in sales, largely thanks in large part to the hundreds of different colors, textures, and patterns available today. While they do not have the high level of durability found in natural materials like natural stone or granite, their low cost and relatively low maintenance factor make them an attractive alternative for homeowners looking for an affordable top surface. For this reason, it is no wonder that countertop buyers are electing to purchase custom-made countertop instead of the more common premade choices. This way, homeowners can ensure that they receive exactly what they want with almost no hassle or expense.

One of the most important things to keep in mind when selecting a custom countertop is to select one with the same design on both the front and back. Although there are some exceptions to this rule, most manufacturers consider a countertop to be complete when both sides of the piece display the same color. While this doesn’t mean a seamless match between the top and the rest of the room, if there is even the smallest amount of difference between the two sides, it will be easy to recognize where the border came from and whether the two are close enough to match up visually. Because custom-made countertop tend to be larger and take up more space than premade countertop, it is often a good idea to see how close a match you can get between the two before paying for the custom order. If you don’t feel as though you are getting a great match, there may still be ways to edit the top, such as removing the edge design on the right and left side of the piece.

When ordering your custom-made countertop from kitchen remodeling company, be sure to let the manufacturer know how you intend to use it. While you could simply cut out the design with a band saw, many manufacturers offer the option of pressboard cutting. Pressboard is a composite substance that resemble chipboard, but it has none of the grain patterns found on wood. Because pressboard is a thin material, it lets you cut through it at an angle without dealing with the difficulties of knife marks, so if your countertop is already made, you should be able to test fit your new cut on the back of a flat blade and confirm that it works correctly.

After you have ordered your countertop, it is time to get to the scribing part. First, remove all of the hardware and any glue that may be used with the installation, and then set everything aside. Next, lay paper down on the countertop and trace a straight line between the corners of the first cut, and across the countertop to the next cut. When you first scribe a line, you will probably have to make a few corrections to fit the striking direction and to make the line accurate. It is also possible to use a pencil to mark the corners if the paper isn’t straight.

Once you have the straightedge ready, remove the paper and use a sharp, square scribing tool to mark the cut. If the countertop has a wooden overhang, you will need to make three or four passes with the scribing tool over the rough edge. This will help to level the area and to keep everything uniform. After each pass, the scribe will grab the undersided part of the countertop and drag it back toward the main countertop surface. This dragging process will create an overhang on one side of the countertop.

The final step of the process is to secure the scribed lines to the countertop by using epoxy or bonding glue. Epoxy works well with solid surfaces because it is a hardener, which bonds the two surfaces together in one piece. Using bonding glue allows you to easily stick the countertop to the wall, which will give you a clean, professional look. Customized countertop can be designed to fit any room, and you can take your time to match your design to the countertop materials to create a one-of-a-kind look.